How will you play your pocket aces?

•  You can move all in because you have an over pair to all the cards on the flop.

•  You can bet $300. You don't want to give your rival a free card because of possibility of making a straight and flush draws.

•  You can check all the way because this flop is not good to play for you.

Conclusion

In this case, the second poker strategy is better. With two suited face cards on the flop, there is a variety of hands and draws that your rival could call with. You don't want to give your rivals a free card. It is also probable your rival might call with a king, which your pocket aces can beat.

Situation 7

The blinds are $10-$25. Every poker player is having $1000 chips. You are having A A. You bring it in, from first position, for $100 that is four times the size of the big blind. One player called the raise. There are two blinds ($10 and $25), your $100 and your rival's $100 in the pot which totals to $235.

The flop is


How will you play your hand?

•  You can bet all in because you are sure to have the best poker hand and don't want to give any free cards.

•  You can check intending will bet. If he doesn't have 5 in his hand, your hand would be best.

•  You can check all the way to the river because he might have the 5 and you don't want to get busted.

Conclusion

You can prefer the second option. Unless your rival is lucky enough to have the case five in his hand (the last five) you have the nuts. You have to give him a chance to make a pair, which would give him a lower playing full house than yours, or to make a bluff at the pot. It is unlikely to have five in his hand as he called $100 to see the flop.

Situation 8

The blinds are $10-$25. Every player is having $1000 chips. You are having AA. You bring it in, from first position, for $100 that is four times the size of the big blind. One player called the raise. There are two blinds ($10 and $25), your $100 and your rival's $100 in the pot which totals to $235.

The flop is


How would you play?

•  You can slow-play by checking so as to give your rival a chance to bet because you have the top over pair and the nut flush draw.

•  You can bet $300 because he might make a straight.

•  You can bet all your chips because you have an over pair and certainly the premium hand.

Conclusion

The first option is recommended. This is a strong flop of your aces, especially since you have the nut flush draw to go with your big over pair. You should always be ready to go all in with this hand if required.

Playing Kings before the Flop

After the pocket aces, the other real pair to play is pocket kings which is the best starting poker hand to play before the flop. We will play a pair of kings in the same way that we play with our two aces. We want to raise three or four times the big blind when we are the first player to enter the pot. You can also go all in with your pair of kings.

If someone re-raises your initial raise, it is always correct to re-raise or move all-in, especially when you are new to the game. You will have the best starting hand except sometimes where you run into aces.

It is difficult to fold your pair of kings before the flop it takes an experienced poker player to be able to make this lay-down. This is the reason why reading your rivals hands is so important. For example, a very solid player (whom you have never raises without a hand) raises three to four times the size of the big blind. Another player re-raises him four times his initial raise. The solid player then moves in.

Sometimes if you are vigilant into the game you must know that the solid poker player has AA.

When you are 90 percent sure that you are correct, you will be able to make the lay-down.

Situation 9

You are in the $25 big blind with:

The first three players limp in for $25 followed by the button and the small blind, making a total of five players already in the pot. There is $150 in the pot.

How will you play?

•  You can check and wait to see the cards the flop.

•  You can move all in and hope you win it here.

•  You can raise the pot to $175.

Conclusion

The third option is the preferred play. You must raise to knock out the field. If you check, you are asking for someone to outdraw your kings. Like aces, you should remember that you want some action with kings. By raising to $175 will limit the field and thus giving the better chance to win the pot.

Situation 10

The blinds are $10-$25. Reckless Ricky brings it in for $125 from first position. Solid Samuel, in the middle position, calls. Everyone else folds to you on the button. You lost $500 a few hands earlier and only have $500 left in your stack. You are holding


How will you play?

•  You can smooth call and save your remaining $375 to bet on the flop if an ace doesn't come.

•  You can move all in your chips.

•  You can raise to $250 to make the pot big.

Conclusion

You are short-stack with only $500 chips. There is $285 in the pot which contains two blinds, Reckless Ricky raise and Solid Samuel call. You are going to play this pot all the way and want to give yourself the best chance of winning it. The fewer the players sees the flop, the better it is for you to win the pot. You move all in expecting to knock out as many players as you can. If everyone folds, you win $285 a good improvement in your chip position. Therefore the second option is recommended to play.

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